Literature | The Daily Star
  • The Colours of Tomorrow

    2140. Earth has been given to Mechatronix for the protection of its remaining animals. Most of these are humans and are often the most chaotic.

  • TWO POEMS

    Butterflies flit, turn and flutter

  • Light Mist

    She wished to become a light mist

  • Rokeya and Woolf: Souls that Have Lived

    There are some amazing similarities between the Bengali writer Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain (1880-1932) and her English counterpart Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) that will make you wonder whether every great soul that has ever lived experiences the same dimension of reality in different shapes.

  • The 42nd Annual Book Sale of the Friends of the Library, Trinity College, University of Toronto and a Book Buy (Part II)

    It was Leo Tolstoy whose Yasnaya Polyana residence and retreat located outside Moscow was classified by him as his 'inaccessible literary stronghold.

  • The Story of Sounds

    Life is an art, the art that has the magnificent capacity to preserve itself. The challenge is to discover the beauty of that how of those

  • Seeking a Story

    Nineteen ninety-nine. Dhaka, Bangladesh. My college is over and I am having the pre-kingly hours of my life—waiting for results before applying to a university.

  • Muri-Makha -Pherey-Asha

    Conversations end with half nibbled canapés,

  • The 42nd Annual Book Sale of the Friends of the Library, Trinity College, University of Toronto and a Book Buy (Part 1)

    The University of Toronto (UFT) holds an annual book sale every October at its prestigious academic and architectural landmark building Trinity College established in 1851.

  • Between History and Identity: Freud and the Non-European

    Quite differently from the spirit of Freud's deliberately provocative reminders that Judaism's founder was a non-Jew, and that Judaism beginsin the realm of Egyption, non-Jewish monotheism, Israeli legislation countervenes, represses, and even cancels Freud's carefully maintained opening out of Jewish identity towards its non-Jewish background. (Said, 66)

  • In the Ring

    An eye for an eye leaves the whole world blind-

  • Toy-cart

    I was just up from bed; even the sun was not quite high yet. Some shalik birds were quarreling on top of the trees near the backyard gate and I was wondering how to ask mother for the plantain chops that were kept in the shika from last night's dinner.

  • The Haven Searchers

    I often see death hovering above everything, sticking out its tentacles, and taking someone in its mouth on a whim. Its belly is swollen with the lives it has consumed and its mouth drips with the sorrows of those. It is an invisible (to the mortals) aerial creature. It flies fast despite being so heavy. It is omnipresent, and in the ocean, it is as visible as a boat shaped moon on a mirror-like pond.

  • The DSC Prize for South Asian Literature 2018: Shortlist Announced

    In an article early this month we presented the story in brief behind the DSC Prize for South Asian Literature and the longlist of 2018. The story has indeed progressed further since then.

  • The “Things in Heaven and Earth”:

    “The girl who, somehow strangely resembles Ranu, raised her eyes -a slight smirk hanging in the corner of her lips” – thus ended Devi (1985), closely followed by the second of the Misir Ali sequence, Nishithini in 1986.

  • The Night Falls

    The heart hurts when it does

  • Two poems by Shaira Afrida Oyshee

    I grew up with pickle jars

  • Two poems by Shaira Afrida Oyshee

    I grew up with pickle jars

  • Two poems by Shaira Afrida Oyshee

    I grew up with pickle jars

  • Tagore and China: A Cambridge Perspective

    Unnoticed I am going away/ Just as nobody saw me come./I clasp my hands and bow my head/As clouds puff up in the west…

  • A Teacher, A Torchbearer

    Each time on the eve of a new semester, it is not absolutely uncommon for any university student to feel overwhelmed for many reasons. Faces of the teachers from the bygone

  • When Olga Grjasnowa Comes to Dhaka

    I met Olga Grjasnowa early this November when she came to a program at ULAB jointly hosted by the University and the Goethe Institute Bangladesh. She had a couple of sessions at the Dhaka Literary Festival too.

  • Land of the Thunder Dragon

    At the end of the waterfall of dying lights from the celestial fireball,

  • Out of Grace

    I don't have it in me I'm a fire that can't ignite I'm a torch that doesn't ignite the light

  • Henpecked

    The harmonium is massive in size. Antique and made of German reeds. Though time's whiplash left dark marks on it, its exquisite face still attracts its viewers.

  • A Girl

    “A girl,” the nurse had said and the mother had frowned. “A girl,” she turned those words over in her head, mumbled them slowly. “A girl,” she said to the nurse, “I hope the world would be fair to her.” The nurse looked motionless as if she heard those words coming out of every mother's mouth.

  • The Other Side of the River

    Under the perky moon, Sitting by my beloved, Surrounded with the guitar

  • From Mir Mosharraf Hossain's Bishad Shindhu (Ocean of Sorrow)

    Why is there no one around? Why is no human being in view? But there are still those in the rooms set aside for them. No changes were visible thus in the quarter where Lord Husayn's kinsmen and women had been kept.

  • After the Half-Time Interval: Part-2

    The next day, Lebu had really blasted a peto at the party's office. Well, he had tried to. The peto had fallen off his maimed hand, right in front of the table. It didn't bounce — rather sort of slumped — like a ball in a slow spin. Everyone shrank in fear. Babluda, the secretary, had pulled his legs up on the bench. He pressed his palms against his ears and stared, wide-eyed.

  •  Things That Write Me

    I do not write. I am not a writer. I am an active thought, willing to reveal through words the enigmas of human lives and the perplexities of women's stories.

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