‘Lockdowns’ around the world | The Daily Star
12:00 AM, April 03, 2020 / LAST MODIFIED: 12:00 AM, April 03, 2020

‘Lockdowns’ around the world

RUBBER BULLETS, BATONS, WHIPS

South Africa: Soldiers towered over youngsters in South Africa's Soweto township, forcing them to do push-ups and roll on the floor as punishment for not adhering to a lockdown meant to halt the spread of coronavirus. Rubber bullets, tear gas and whips have been used to maintain social distancing in shopping queues and to discipline citizens caught outside their homes without any valid reason.

'SHOOT THEM DEAD'

Philippines: Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has told security forces they should shoot dead anyone causing "trouble" in areas locked down due to the coronavirus pandemic. About half the country's roughly 110 million people are currently under quarantine -- including millions in deep poverty, left jobless by tough restrictions on movement.

 

TOTAL AND PARTIAL SHUTDOWNS

China: Nearly sixty millions of people were caught in Hubei or stuck outside it for two months after China shut down the central province to curb the spread of coronavirus. Residents were barred from leaving homes, requiring them to order food and other supplies online. Several other Chinese cities were also put under a virtual lockdown and travel between provinces was severely limited by the cancellation of long-distance buses and trains.

India: Police have strictly enforced the nationwide lockdown even though PM Modi said essential services would be maintained. Already there have been reports of police beating to death a man who left his house to buy groceries. People venturing out without good reason could be arrested, fined up to 1,000 rupees (S$19.03) and jailed for as long as six months.

Italy: The country implemented its first lockdown in late February in 11 municipalities in the north. A nationwide lockdown was put in place on March 9. It has banned all but core strategic activities, while shuttering restaurants, most shops, bars, schools and universities. Anyone caught on the streets without a valid reason risks a fine of  up to 3,000 euros (S$4,697). Authorities have charged more than 40,000 people so far for violating the lockdown.

 

STAY-HOME ORDERS

The United States and Germany: At least 21 states, representing more than half the American population of 330 million, have closed non-essential businesses and told residents to stay home. Despite being the third worst-hit European country after Italy and Spain, Germany has not introduced stringent measures. It has urged the population to stay indoors and limit contact with other people as much as possible.

 

GENDER-BASED PROHIBITIONS

Panama: The Central American country has separated citizens by gender in a stringent effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus. Starting from April 1, men and women can only leave their homes for two hours at a time, and on different days. Men will be able to go to the supermarket or the pharmacy on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, while women will be allowed out on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Sunday is no-go day for all.

 

'No nagging' wife

Malaysia: The Malaysian government was forced to apologize after its Women's Development Department published a series of sexist "tips" to help deal with the ongoing coronavirus lockdown, including advising women to continue to wear makeup and to "avoid nagging." Malaysia has enacted strict nationwide controls locking down all travel in or out of the country and heavily restricting movement within the country.

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